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Maniapoto Māori Trust Board acknowledge departing Chief Executive

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board acknowledge departing Chief Executive

The Maniapoto Māori Trust Board (MMTB) and its Chief Executive Sonya Hetet have confirmed her farewell from the organisation now that her fixed term contract as CEO has come to an end.  The Board would like to acknowledge Sonya’s significant contribution during the past ten years of her mahi with MMTB, and particularly the last two years as CEO.  Sonya’s last day with the MMTB will be Wednesday the 4th of December 2019. The Board would like to wish Sonya all the very best for what lies ahead.

EXPLORE

more kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Whīkoi mo Te Reo 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Inaugural Awards Rekindles Historical Gathering

Kawenata Logo (White)

Inaugural Awards Rekindles Historical Gathering

Suits, neck ties and floor length dresses will adorn the Māhoenui Memorial Hall on Friday 6th December when affiliates of Ngāti Maniapoto me ōna hapū maha and residents of the Te Nehenehenui region are recognised at the 2019 Inaugural Ngāti Maniapoto me ōna hapū maha, Kawenata Awards.

The awards event is centred around the principles of an ancient Kawenata or covenant inspired by Te Rangituataka Tākerei, a great chief of the Mōkau district who convened a gathering of leaders, elders and children 115 years ago at Māhoenui to deliberate a way forward for Ngāti Maniapoto me ōna hapū maha.

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board Chair, Mr Tiwha Bell said, “we want to provide an all-encompassing ceremony that endeavours to recognise leaders, elders and young people achieving and contributing across multiple areas of the community.”

“240 names were nominated for the Awards. 100 of those names were short listed to 50 finalists by a dedicated judging panel. 25 winners were then selected based on the guiding principles of the 1904 Kawenata. A winner who has unreservedly demonstrated leadership, nobility and wisdom will also be awarded the Te Rangituataka Supreme Award.” said Mr Bell.

The awards are proudly supported by the descendants of Te Rangituataka, Maniapoto Māori Trust Board, Ministry of Education, Ruapuha Uekaha Hapū Trust, Te Reo Irirangi o Maniapoto (MFM) and Waitomo District Council. Guests on the night will include the Hon. Nanaia Mahuta and recent ambassadors to Tahiti, Te Kapa Haka o Ngā Pua o Te Kōwhara.

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Keep up-to-date with our latest kaupapa by clicking on the following video:

“Matariki Mātao, Matariki Piripiri, Matariki Tāpuapua”

100th Anniversary of flagstaff honours 77 Maniapoto men from World War 1

This pou kara or flagstaff memorial records and honours the names of  77 men from Ngāti Maniapoto who served overseas during the Great War. Twelve men lost their lives.  These men have a star next to their name.

The memorial was unveiled on 11 November 1919. It was funded by a collection amongst the tribe in July of that year when memories of the war were still very much vivid.  The King Country Chronicle reported that it was a notable gathering, Māori from all parts coming to attend the ceremony. Dr Maui Pomare, M.P. for Western Māori, unveiled the monument.  Mr. W. T. Jennings, the local M.P., remarked:

“This noble monument … would stand for all time as a record of the splendid deeds that had been performed and of our reverence for the sacrifices that had been made.”[1]

 

 

Others recorded in attendance included the Ngāti Tūwharetoa paramount chief, Te Heuheu Tūkino, Mita Keepa of Te Arawa, Major Salmon, a former Commanding Officer of the Māori Contingent, Captain Vercoe D.S.O, D.C.M., Mr John Hetet and Mr W. Lorigan, on behalf of the Mayor.

The Te Kuiti District Historical Society hold photos from the original unveiling.

It was also commented on by the local newspaper at the time that Te Kuiti generally had not yet erected a memorial and that the Māori had in effect shown them up their Pākehā brethren.

Interestingly, in many cases, the names recorded on the memorial are not the names that the men enlisted under.  Many enlisted under English derivations or completely different names to hide their age. For example, Lt. Mania Erihi is the Māori name of Lt. Oliver Sydney Ellis while Wi Amohanga, aged 14, enlisted as George Nicholls. Tribal researchers have identified all but one of the enlistment names.

The stories of many of these men make for interesting reading.  Among the men is a very committed Rewi Erihi or Stanley Ellis who made his way to England after being rejected at home for medical reasons. He joined the Royal Army Corps Mechanical Transport Section. There is also Taare Tūwhakaririka or Charles Barton, the second Maori pilot in the Royal Airforce and Pau Timi Tana or Ned Turner who sadly lost his life on 25 April 1915 when the Allied Forces landed on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Further, there are five Wi brothers from Te Kuiti who enlisted and six Clarke brothers from Ngati Parewaeone of Otorohanga.  Three of the Clarke brothers sadly lost their lives.

This restoration work was undertaken by VJ Williams of Te Kuiti. with the support of the Trustees of Te Tokanganui-a-noho marae, the Ruapuha Uehaka Hapū Trust,  the Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and the Lotteries WW100 Committee.

The Te Kuiti District Historical Society hold photos from the original unveiling.

The memorial was restored for the very reason that was scripted on the flagstaff, namely, ‘Hei mohiotanga mo te iwi me te atua me nga uri a muri ake nei, na reira, ka whakamaua nga ingoa o nga tamariki katoa o Maniapoto i haere i uru i mate ki te pakanga, e mau nei o ratou ingoa. [So that the people and God and future descendants may know, hence the names are recorded of all the boys of Ngati Maniapoto who went and died in the war.]

E kore rātou e warewaretia.

*Photo Credit: Te Kuiti & District Historical Society

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more kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Whīkoi mo Te Reo 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kaumātua Games show a dynamic mix of competitive spirit and fun

“E tupu atu kūmara e ohu e te anuhe”

As the kūmara grows, caterpillars emerge and gather around it. The source of strength in a community is shown by its leadership. Ruruhi and koroheke from throughout the Nehenehenui and beyond took part in the 12th Annual Kaumātua Games at Les Munro Centre, last week. With the support of tamariki and volunteers, there was a clear connection and co-operation between rangatahi, kaumātua, and workers that made the kaupapa such a great success.

Every year this kaupapa provides an amazing opportunity for all to see our kaumātua in action and establish a lasting whanaungatanga between Maniapoto, Raukawa, Taranaki kaumātua and more. Strongly highlighting the relationship between kaumātua and rangatahi, thus bridging the gap through authentic and organic whakawhanaungatanga.

The Te Kuiti Kaumātua Games is an event for kaumātua aged 55 and over. Organised and prepared by the Te Kuiti Kaumatua Games committee, the kaupapa aims to embrace all things Māori and encourage kaumātua to lift their physical activity through participation in competitive team games, social interaction and community participation. Promoting a healthy lifestyle is a vital goal of this kaupapa as well as making the kaupapa fun and full of laughter for all who attend.

The laughter is always certain with the music and humour of Barry Batley, who has entertained the masses as MC / DJ for the last 10 years.

The biggest achievement is that people are still coming and able to participate, have fun, catch up with old friends and make new ones. The volume of sound and hilarity creates an amazing feeling at the Les Munroe Centre. The young people who come to support on the day (this year from Te Kūiti High School) continue to be a beacon for a brighter future, and the kōtahitanga every year grows stronger and stronger.

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Kuiti Kaumātua Games 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

EXPLORE

more kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Whīkoi mo Te Reo 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Maniapoto Research and Communications Platform Survey #2 Results

In our most recent survey we asked what our people thought were the best ways to communicate with our people.

We also asked what grants and distributions the Maniapoto Māori Trust Board and Maniapoto Fisheries Trust should consider.

We’re pleased to advise a report on this survey’s results is now attached for your information.

Questions raised in Survey 1 and 2 will be collated and answers made available to participants in due course.

Prize winners!

We are also pleased to announce the five respondents who won $50 grocery vouches for taking part in the survey. They are:

Joy Mcfadzien,of Invercargill district; Clive Ormsby, Rotorua district; John Hyland, Marlborough district; Roy Haar, Waikato district and Te Urunga Kereopa, Ruapehu district. Congratulations!

Thank you for allowing us to hear your views, your input has been very valuable.

Te Pūtake o te Riri – He Rā Maumahara ki Taranaki 2019

TE PŪTAKE O TE RIRI,
HE RĀ MAUMAHARA KI TARANAKI 2019

All have been invited to attend the National Commemoration Day, He Rā Maumahara ki Taranaki, to commemorate the New Zealand land wars in Taranaki.
The Maniapoto Māori Trust Board has organised a bus to travel down to Taranaki for Maniapoto whānau who would like to attend. This will be a same day return trip (depart Te Kūiti at 7am and returning at 3pm on Monday 28 October), so if you are interested, please contact Dawn on dawn@maniapoto.co.nz asap to confrm your seat.  Please note that the bus will be contingent on confirmed numbers.

Te Pūtake o te Riri, He Rā Maumahara is a series of events being held across Aotearoa which seek to increase awareness among all Aotearoa citizens through the telling and sharing of stories about our local history, significant landmarks and people relating to the period of the New Zealand wars, with the aim of strengthening relationships and partnerships across the country.
This year, the event will be held in Taranaki, and we encourage all whānau to attend in recognition of our historical relationship, and remembering our Maniapoto tūpuna who fought and fell on the battle fields of Waitara.

This is an opportunity for our pakeke and rangatahi to follow in the steps of their tupuna and learn an important part of our tribal history, to give respect and acknowledge all who fell in Waitara and across the motu. As part of the event guided tours of the battle sites will take place and remembrance ceremonies as well. on M

Preparations are in full swing to host a national initiative, Te Pūtake o te Riri, He Rā Maumahara, to commemorate the New Zealand land wars in Taranaki.


Te Pūtake o te Riri, He Rā Maumahara is a series of events being held across Aotearoa New Zealand which seek to increase awareness among all Aotearoa New Zealand citizens through the telling and sharing of stories about our local history, significant landmarks and people relating to the period of the New Zealand wars, with the aim of strengthening relationships and partnerships across the country. This year the events are taking place in Taranaki from 28-30 October 2019.


Dr Ruakere Hond who is a key member of the working party coordinating the event in Taranaki says that Te Pūtake o te Riri gives the community the opportunity to participate in an event that focuses on our nation’s local history – a history that not many New Zealanders know about.

 

 Register NOW!!!! – https://docs.google.com/…/1FAIpQLSeTf-e6jk15YStIt…/viewform…

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this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuawhā

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

 
Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Kua eke ki te wiki tuawhā o Mahuru Māori. Ki a koutou katoa e kōrero ana i te reo Māori, kia ū, kia kaha, kia mau ki tēnā, ki te kawau mārō, whanake ake, whanake ake. Ko tēnei te pōhi whakamutunga e pā ana ki ēnei kupu hou. This is our last 5 kupu hou and additional kīwaha for the fourth week of Mahuru Māori.
 
We’re using Maniapoto and Te Reo Māori kupu that will give you a deeper understanding of te Reo o Te Nehenehenui me te Reo Māori.
 
Karawhiua! Ākina te reo, kōrerongia kia haemata!
 
 

Whēururangi (noun) only boy in a family of girls

He whēururangi te tāne a Tama i roto i tōna whānau, ka aroha. Tamas son is the only boy in their family, how sad.

 

Rimarima (noun) fingers

I wera aku rimarima I runga I te pārua o te kōhua. I burnt my fingers on the edge of the pot.

 

Kīkītara (noun) rash-nappy rash

Kia pai te naungau I ngā rau o te koromiko ā pania ki te kīkītara hei whakaora ake. Chew koromiko leaves well and then smear it on the rash to clear it up.

 

Pū-aroha (noun) loving

He tino pū-aroha tō mātou whaea ki a mātou. Ka nui hoki tō mātou aroha ki a ia. Our mother is very loving to us. We love her very much.

 

Huatau (noun) well-mannered

He whanonga huatau tā te rangatira. Good manners are possessed by chiefs.

 

Taringa hākeke! (interjection) Mushroom ears! (no ears at all)

Taringa hākeke! Ka kore anō hoki he taringa o te tāne rā. Mushroom ears! That boy has no ears.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

He Kōwharawhara | Rangatahi Wānanga 2019

The purpose of this wānanga is to further identify and discuss future aspirations of Maniapoto rangatahi and provide a forum to actively engage in key kaupapa currently facing Maniapoto me ona hapū maha. This wānanga aims to create an environment for our rangatahi to identify Post Settlement Governance Entity (PSGE) focus areas and provide input on future Maniapoto aspirations from a rangatahi perspective. 

He Kōwharawhara 2019 wānanga sessions discussed the following:

  • Share feedback from He Kōwharawhara 2018 Rangatahi Wānanga and identify any gaps or further points to add to the summary.
  • Post Settlement Governance Entity (PSGE) whakaaro on:
    • Trustee attributes and skillset required
    • Future opportunities to consider so the PSGE can benefit all with visible returns for our people. – “Ngā Pou o te Mana Whatu Āhuru” session and Co-Design:
  • What would you do differently and how can we implement change?

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival

2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuatoru

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

 
Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Kua ea, kua hiki te kaupapa o Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.
Kua tae ki te wiki tuatoru o Mahuru Māori.
This is our 5 new words and additional kīwaha for the third week of Mahuru Māori.
We’re using Maniapoto and Te Reo Māori kupu that will give you a deeper understanding of te Reo o Te Nehenehenui me te Reo Māori.
Karawhiua! Ākina te reo, kōrerongia kia haemata!
 

Ahurangi (noun) pure of heart

Ka taea te rire-o-ngā-rangi e te hunga ahurangi. The pure of heart shall attain the heights of heaven.

 

Pīkako (noun) ear wax

E kī katoa ana tō taringa I te pīkako. Your ear is all full of wax.

 

Wātena (noun) warden;māori

He maha ngā wā e taea ana e ngā wātena ki te awhina atu I ngā tatou taitamariki. Māori Wardens are often in a position of power and able to help our youths.

 

Kaiwhakaaweawe (noun) match maker

Ko ngā tāngata e kimihia ana he hoa-paruhi me to atu ki tētahi kaiwhakaaweawe. People who are looking for their perfect partner may wish to visit a match maker.

 

Piha (noun) butcher

Ko te maripi a te piha he maripi tino koi rawa atu. A butcher’s knife is a very sharp knife indeed.

 

Haere ki rahaki! (interjection) Get out of the way!

Kīa atu ēnā kia haere ki rahaki! Kei te pōrearea noa iho te tū mai i konā. They were told to get out of the way because they’re just a nuisance standing there.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuarua

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

 
Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, te wiki tuarua o Mahuru Māori. This is our 5 new Maniapoto, Māori words for the second week of Mahuru Māori.

Karawhiua! Ākina te reo! Kōrerongia kia haemata!

Whatu (noun) Adams apple

He tino nui te whatu o ētahi tāne. Some men have a very large adams apple.

 

Whakakeke (noun) trouble maker

I mārama tonu ki te kura-mahita ko wai te ākonga heahea noa iho. It was evident to the teacher which student was the trouble maker.

 

Uri-kotahi (noun) only child

Ka whakapuhia te uri-kotahi e ōna mātua, he mea kōpeka noa iho. An only child will be spoilt by it’s parents and grandparents alike.

 

Takawaha (noun) bragger

He kīkiki he takawaha hoki ia. He is a fool and a bragger.

 

Rata (noun) healer

Ahakoa he mana kaha te mana o te rata e kore rawa ia I taea te pāpuni I a Mate. Although the healers powers were strong he could not stop death.

 

He puhi rā!

(interjection) Spoilt brat!

He puhi rā!, me tohatoha koe i te haukai kei tō aroaro.  Spoilt brat, you must share the feast that has been placed before you.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­