He Kōwharawhara | Rangatahi Wānanga 2019

The purpose of this wānanga is to further identify and discuss future aspirations of Maniapoto rangatahi and provide a forum to actively engage in key kaupapa currently facing Maniapoto me ona hapū maha. This wānanga aims to create an environment for our rangatahi to identify Post Settlement Governance Entity (PSGE) focus areas and provide input on future Maniapoto aspirations from a rangatahi perspective. 

He Kōwharawhara 2019 wānanga sessions discussed the following:

  • Share feedback from He Kōwharawhara 2018 Rangatahi Wānanga and identify any gaps or further points to add to the summary.
  • Post Settlement Governance Entity (PSGE) whakaaro on:
    • Trustee attributes and skillset required
    • Future opportunities to consider so the PSGE can benefit all with visible returns for our people. – “Ngā Pou o te Mana Whatu Āhuru” session and Co-Design:
  • What would you do differently and how can we implement change?

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival

2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuatoru

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

 
Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Kua ea, kua hiki te kaupapa o Te Wiki o te Reo Māori.
Kua tae ki te wiki tuatoru o Mahuru Māori.
This is our 5 new words and additional kīwaha for the third week of Mahuru Māori.
We’re using Maniapoto and Te Reo Māori kupu that will give you a deeper understanding of te Reo o Te Nehenehenui me te Reo Māori.
Karawhiua! Ākina te reo, kōrerongia kia haemata!
 

Ahurangi (noun) pure of heart

Ka taea te rire-o-ngā-rangi e te hunga ahurangi. The pure of heart shall attain the heights of heaven.

 

Pīkako (noun) ear wax

E kī katoa ana tō taringa I te pīkako. Your ear is all full of wax.

 

Wātena (noun) warden;māori

He maha ngā wā e taea ana e ngā wātena ki te awhina atu I ngā tatou taitamariki. Māori Wardens are often in a position of power and able to help our youths.

 

Kaiwhakaaweawe (noun) match maker

Ko ngā tāngata e kimihia ana he hoa-paruhi me to atu ki tētahi kaiwhakaaweawe. People who are looking for their perfect partner may wish to visit a match maker.

 

Piha (noun) butcher

Ko te maripi a te piha he maripi tino koi rawa atu. A butcher’s knife is a very sharp knife indeed.

 

Haere ki rahaki! (interjection) Get out of the way!

Kīa atu ēnā kia haere ki rahaki! Kei te pōrearea noa iho te tū mai i konā. They were told to get out of the way because they’re just a nuisance standing there.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Maniapoto confirms not enough evidence to support shawl origin

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board Chairman, R.Tiwha Bell, asks for whānau to remain calm in relation to the kaitaka styled cloak purportedly associated with Rewi Manga Maniapoto, that was to be auctioned in England, now cancelled.

Members of the Maniapoto Māori Trust Board were made aware of the cloak and discussed it with tribal knowledge holders. “We concluded that there was just not enough evidence to establish the provenance of the cloak in terms of its association with Rewi Maniapoto” said Mr Bell.

“The only evidence we have is a note which reads ‘Māori mat worn by the chief Rewi when peace was declared between Māori and Europeans after the battle of Ōrākau”. However Mr Bell questions the historical accuracy of the statement. “Peace was not made after the Battle of Ōrākau. Rewi and the other survivors escaped and retreated across the Pūniu River into Maniapoto territory where they set up an aukati – a line that was not to be crossed by Europeans.” It was not until some twenty odd years later that the aukati was lifted and a peace negotiated.

Maniapoto Historian, Dr Tom Roa says that the Battle of Ōrākau was New Zealand’s Thermopylae: “It was quickly romanticised by colonial writers of the day as this heroic but futile last stand by Rewi and his followers.” Dr Roa notes that Rewi Maniapoto and the Battle of Ōrākau were retold in stories, poems and even a movie, and while Maniapoto celebrate him as one of their most important 19th century leaders, Pākehā also developed a fascination with this great Māori hero. “I’m sure it would have been pretty popular to have something purported to belong to Rewi. Whether it was authentic or not is another matter.” Dr Roa believes more investigation needs to be undertaken to establish the provenance of the cloak noting the tribe has some leading experts in the art of weaving such garments.

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuarua

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

 
Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Te Wiki o te Reo Māori, te wiki tuarua o Mahuru Māori. This is our 5 new Maniapoto, Māori words for the second week of Mahuru Māori.

Karawhiua! Ākina te reo! Kōrerongia kia haemata!

Whatu (noun) Adams apple

He tino nui te whatu o ētahi tāne. Some men have a very large adams apple.

 

Whakakeke (noun) trouble maker

I mārama tonu ki te kura-mahita ko wai te ākonga heahea noa iho. It was evident to the teacher which student was the trouble maker.

 

Uri-kotahi (noun) only child

Ka whakapuhia te uri-kotahi e ōna mātua, he mea kōpeka noa iho. An only child will be spoilt by it’s parents and grandparents alike.

 

Takawaha (noun) bragger

He kīkiki he takawaha hoki ia. He is a fool and a bragger.

 

Rata (noun) healer

Ahakoa he mana kaha te mana o te rata e kore rawa ia I taea te pāpuni I a Mate. Although the healers powers were strong he could not stop death.

 

He puhi rā!

(interjection) Spoilt brat!

He puhi rā!, me tohatoha koe i te haukai kei tō aroaro.  Spoilt brat, you must share the feast that has been placed before you.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Te Ara o Tūrongo, Rerewē – Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019

“Te Ara o Tūrongo, Tikitiki! Orapōta!

Te Nehenehenui Tribal Festival 2019 kicked off at Piopio College in Te Piopiotanga o te Rīwai. In it’s 6th year running, over 200 performers took the stage with 10 kapa haka groups standing with particular focus on the theme of Te Ara o Tūrongo, Te Ara Rerewē.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Whīkoi mo Te Reo 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

New place names restore Maniapoto history

Hon Eugenie Sage

Minister for Land Information
Minita mō Toitū Te Whenua

Media Statement

6 September 2019

New place names restore Maniapoto history

Māori place names have been restored to the small central North Island town of Benneydale, and a nearby stretch of the North Island Main Trunk railway announced Minister for Land Information Eugenie Sage.

Benneydale has been changed to a dual name ‘Maniaiti / Benneydale’ and the main trunk railway between Te Awamutu and Taumarunui, is now named ‘Te Ara-o-Tūrongo’ following a request from Ngāti Maniapoto.

“I am pleased to restore official place names which bring to light our history for everyone to celebrate and enjoy. I accepted the recommendation of the New Zealand Geographic Board that there be the dual name Maniaiti / Benneydale in recognition of the unique histories of both names” said Eugenie Sage.

“The original Māori name, Maniaiti, has been maintained through oral tradition for the land on which the town lies and for the hill nearby. The name means ‘a small slide, slip’.”

Benneydale, home to nearly 200 people was established around 1940 to house workers mining coal discovered in the area. The name Benneydale is a combination of the surnames of the Under-Secretary for Mines, Charlie Benney, and the Mine Superintendent at the time, Tom Dale.

In 1885 Ngāti Maniapoto leaders gave land to the Crown to be used for the construction of the railway on Premier Robert Stout’s assurance that the section running through the district would be called ‘Tūrongo’, a significant tupuna (ancestor) of many Tainui groups. The name Te Ara-o-Tūrongo means ‘the track of Tūrongo’ or ‘Tūrongo’s pathway.’

Both name changes follow proposals to the New Zealand Geographic Board Ngā Pou Taunaha o Aotearoa by Te Arawhiti – the Office of Māori Crown Relations (formerly Office of Treaty Settlements), on behalf of Treaty claimants Ngāti Maniapoto.

Ngāti Maniapoto and Ngāti Rereahu share mana whenua over this area.

Chairman for Te Maru o Rereahu Iwi Trust, Eric Crown, says Rereahu are very happy to hear that the New Zealand Geographic Board has accepted our historical record and the Minister has chosen to acknowledge the dual name of Maniaiti / Benneydale.

“It has always been important to Rereahu that our history and reo is maintained and enhanced not only for this generation, but for generations to come. This acknowledgement will not only allow a more complete understanding of our Rereahu Iwi history in the area but will also be an embodiment of the duality envisaged in the Treaty of Waitangi.”

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board Chairman, R Tiwha Bell, says that “the recognition of the original name Maniaiti reflects the wishes of kaumātua of Ngāti Rereahu who sought this outcome as part of the Treaty settlement negotiations with the Crown. We are pleased their wishes have been achieved.”

ENDS

Media Contact: Rick Zwaan 021 845 587 rick.zwaan@parliament.govt.nz  

 

Kōrerongia kia haemata! – Mahuru Māori Wiki Tuatahi

Taku reo kahika, he reo rere iho
Taku reo kahika, he reo kāmehameha

Me kite, me rongo, me kōrero te Reo māori. Ko Mahuru Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori tēnei te hāpai ake nei, ko Maniapoto tēnei te hāpai ake nei.
 
Join us in celebrating Mahuru Māori by observing, listening, and speaking our treasured language. We will be promoting and sharing 25 Māori words throughout the month of Mahuru and Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori videos to help te Reo Māori flourish like the Kōwharawhara.
 
We’re using Maniapoto and Te Reo Māori kupu that will give you a deeper understanding of te Reo o Te Nehenehenui me te Reo Māori.
 
Ākina te reo, kōrerongia kia haemata!

Whatitoka (noun) door

E kō, tēnā, tūtakina te whatitoka!  Hey girl, close the door!

 

Utauta (noun) dishes, utensils

Haere ki rō kāuta ki te horoi i ngā utauta rā.  Go into the kitchen and wash those dishes.

 

Koropū (noun) traditional food storage slightly elevated off the ground.

Haria tēnā rukuruku me āna hua o roto ki te Koropū rokiroki ai.  Take that basket and its many contents to storage for preserving.

 

Ritorongokura (noun) place of birth, tranquil space.

He wāhi tapu, he ritorongokura a Ōmarueke.  Koinā te wāhi i whānau mai ai tō tātou tupuna.  Ōmarueke is a sacred and tranquil place.  That is where our ancestor was born.

 

He puku!

(interjection) get you! You’ve got the audacity! Pity about you!

Homai ērā kī, māku e hautū tēnā motokā. / He puku, kātahi anō koe ka whiwhi i tō raihana kohere.  Hand me those keys, I’ll drive that car. / Pity about you, you’ve only just got your restricted license. 

EXPLORE

this kaupapa further by watching the video below:

Maniapoto Māori Trust Board is privileged to have supported Whīkoi mo Te Reo 2019 and look forward to seeing more kaupapa such as this in the near future.

Explore this kaupapa further by watching the video below.­

Kei ngā whānau o Ihumātao te huarahi whakamua

Friday 2nd August 2019

Kei ngā whānau o Ihumātao te huarahi whakamua

 

The Maniapoto Māori Trust Board fully support the whānau of Ihumātao coming together to resolve a way forward for the lands of Ihumātao.

On Saturday 3rd August, Kīngi Tūheitia will be leading a delegation to Ihumātao. The purpose of this visit is to provide an opportunity for the King to listen to the views of the whānau.

We support Kīngi Tūheitia’s view that the resolution of these issues can only be resolved through the leadership and direction of the whānau of Ihumātao themselves.

 

Nō reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā tātou katoa

Te Kūiti wahine creates pathways for teachers and tamariki

Te Kūiti wahine creates pathways for teachers and tamariki

It’s been a year of adventure for Kelly Tregoweth, who recently moved from the larger inland city Hamilton to the small farming town Te Kūiti. Officially taking up the Centre Manager role at Te Pukeiti Early Childhood Centre, Kelly has returned to her passion to growing our people and our tamariki.

Born and raised within the Maniapoto boundaries in Te Kūiti, Kelly’s parents were, and continue to be, very dedicated members of their community and  marae, Oparure. Her early years revolved around her whānau and a childhood that saw many days at the marae with her grandmother. Childhood memories combined with a strong sense of identity, passion, determination and people uniting to achieve a shared purpose, it’s not a supriseto see Kelly return to Te Nehenehenui with her expertise to create pathways for the people of her hometown.

 

Having a strong grounding and connection to Oparure, Ngāti Kinohaku, Kelly attended Te Kūiti Primary and High School where the natural sportswoman excelled at Netball and various leadership management roles. She says her experience as House Captain in 6th Form (Year 12) and representing Maniapoto Reps Netball encouraged her to continue her extracurricular activities and managerial skills. To that end, Kelly immediately found work across fields such as food, retail and labor work which saw her hold many positions that placed her at the managerial level.

Spending time away in Australia, Kelly was quick to realise that her new environment could never replace home, thus deciding to make the permanent move back to Aotearoa where she furthered her tertiary studies in Tourism Management and completed a Bachelor Degree in ECE at Wintecs Hamilton campus. “I worked four days a week, I was a single mum, and studied one day a week. I always had management roles. I was managing a restaurant and I did that until I decided to shift my focus to day care as a reliever,” says Kelly.

It wasn’t without luck, Kelly spent her first day relieving at one centre and her next day she went to another, where she ended up spending 8 years building her experience, gaining qualification and taking her familiar role as manager. The mother of three boys, has taken every opportunity to make the most of her life at home and afar. Kelly says having managers who were always supportive of her instilled a resolve to continue to do the same for teachers and tamariki.

Kelly is passionate about encouraging rangatahi to know who they are and hope to make her tamariki proud. “To support people through study and watch them succeed and become managers in their own right, giving them the tools is what makes me proud.”

EXPLORE

Keep up-to-date with our latest kaupapa by clicking on the following video:

“Matariki Mātao, Matariki Piripiri, Matariki Tāpuapua”